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          Hepatitis B (Hep B) Testing

           

          B a hero
           

          What is Hepatitis B (Hep B)?

          Hepatitis B is a disease caused by infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Infection with HBV can lead to cirrhosis of the liver, liver failure, and liver cancer. 80% of liver cancer worldwide is caused by HBV infection.

          Since the diagnosis of hepatitis B is so easily missed by both patients and their physicians, the only way to diagnose for hepatitis B infection is through a simple and inexpensive blood test.

          HBV infection and the liver cancer and liver failure associated with chronic infection are all vaccine preventable with the hepatitis B vaccine. It is so effective that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization have called the hepatitis B vaccine the first "anti-cancer" vaccine.

          350 - 400 million people in the world are chronically infected with hepatitis B. Hepatitis B takes a life every 30 seconds. Most of these lives are Asian.

          Asian Americans tend to be infected at a much higher rate, with 1 in 10 Asians chronically infected with hepatitis B, compared to 1 in 1000 in the general population. Without treatment or monitoring, 1 in 4 of these individuals will die from liver cancer or liver failure. Many die at the prime of their lives and as early as 30 years of age, leaving behind family members and children.

          In California alone, liver cancer is the #1 leading cause of cancer deaths among Laotian American men, the 2nd leading cause of cancer deaths among Cambodian and Vietnamese men, the 4th leading cause of cancer deaths among Chinese and Korean men, and the 5th leading cause of deaths among Filipino men.

          How is Hepatitis B transmitted?

          Hepatitis B is silently transmitted and has a silent progression. Many people with chronic HBV exhibit no symptoms and feel perfectly healthy. They may even exhibit normal blood test for liver function. Because so many carriers feel fine, even with early stages of liver cancer, the disease can progress without the carrier even knowing it. If symptoms do appear they often are exhibited at the end stages of disease when treatment options are limited or ineffective.

          Hepatitis B is 100 times more infectious than HIV. Because of its infectiousness and because it can survive outside of the body for up to 7 days, HBV can be spread through items such as shared razors and toothbrushes that have contaminated blood on them.

          HBV is transmitted through infected blood in the following ways:

          • From a mother to a child at the time of birth (most common for APIs)
          • Contact with infected blood
          • Unprotected sex

          Among Asian & Pacific Islander community, transmission of HBV frequently occurs during the birth process when the virus is passed on from an infected mother, who is often unaware that she is a carrier, to her baby.


          Testing locations for Hepatitis B

          LOCATION
          San Francisco, CA
          Clinic Site
          BLOOD TEST (HBsAg & Anti HBs)
          Cost & Times
          VACCINATION (3 shots total)
          Cost & Times
          Chinese Hospital
          845 Jackson Street
          1st Floor, Laboratory
          415-677-2303

          Sliding Scale Fee
          Monday-Saturday 2pm-5pm
          $20 / shot
          1st Wednesday of each month 5pm-7pm
          SFDPH Chinatown Public Health Center
          UCSF Hepatitis B Collaborative
          1490 Mason Street
          415-364-7910

          No Fee
          2nd Saturday of each month
          9am-noon
          $10 / shot
          2nd Saturday of each month
          9am-noon
          AITC
          (Adult Immunization & Travel Clinic)
          101 Grove Street, #102
          415-554-2625

          $103
          Mon. & Wed-Friday 9am-4pm
          Tues 9am-3pm
          $65 / shot
          Mon. & Wed.-Friday 9am-4pm
          Tues 9am-3pm
          Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center
          730 Polk Street, 4th floor
          415-292-3400
          Call for appointment

          No Fee
          Wednesday 4pm-7pm
          Friday 2pm-6pm
          1st Saturday of each month 11am-2pm
          Sliding Scale Fee
          Wednesday 4pm-7pm
          Friday 2pm-6pm
          1st Saturday of each month 11am-2pm
          Excelsior Health 官方正版幸运彩票
          888 Paris Street
          415-677-2488

          Sliding Scale Fee
          Monday-Friday
          9am-12noon & 1:30pm-3:30pm
          $20 / shot
          Monday-Friday
          9am-12noon & 1:30pm-3:30pm
          South of Market Health Center
          551 Minna Street
          415-626-2951

          Sliding Scale Fee / Insurance Accepted
          Monday-Thursday
          8am-12noon & 1pm-5pm
          Fri & Sat 8am-12noon & 1-3:30pm
          Sliding Scale Fee / Insurance Accepted
          Monday-Thursday
          8am-12noon & 1pm-5pm
          Fri & Sat 8am-12noon & 1-3:30pm
          Sunset Health 官方正版幸运彩票
          1800 31st Avenue
          415-677-2388

          Sliding Scale Fee
          Monday-Friday
          9am-12noon & 1:30pm-3:30pm
          $20 / shot
          Monday-Friday
          9am-12noon & 1:30pm-3:30pm
          UCSF Medical Center at Mt. Zion
          2330 Post Street, 1st Floor
          415-885-3580

          No Fee
          1st Saturday of each month
          9am-12noon
          Sliding Scale Fee / Insurance Accepted
          1st Saturday of each month
          9am-noon

          Hepatitis B Symptoms

          Hepatitis B is a silent killer. It is asymptomatic so many carriers feel perfectly healthy. Only 30% of those with acute infections develop symptoms. Most Asians/Asian Americans are infected at birth or early childhood, when symptoms may never develop. When symptoms of hepatitis B infection do develop, they include jaundice, fatigue, abdominal pain and loss of appetite.

          For those who are infected as newborns, there is a 90% chance of becoming a chronic carrier. For those infected during childhood, there is a 30%-50% chance. Most Asians are exposed to the disease either during the perinatal period or during childhood.

          There is a 8-15% prevalence rate of the number of chronic carriers within the Asian community. Perinatal transmission is the most common mode of infection. As a result, prevention of perinatal transmission is of utmost importance in the Asian community. Since HBV is very efficiently transmitted by unprotected sex, all Asian/Asian American adults who are sexually active should be vaccinated to prevent infection.

          Treating Hepatitis B

          Not every case of hepatitis B needs to be treated. For those that do, there are several treatment options available. While no cure for hepatitis B has been found, treatment can be used to reduce the liver damage that may result in cirrhosis and liver failure. Effective treatment may also reduce the risk of liver cancer.